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Roozbeh Behroozmand

Roozbeh Behroozmand, pHd

Director, Speech Neuroscience Lab

Roozbeh Behroozmand, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Communication Disorders (COMD) and the Director of Speech Neuroscience Lab in the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. Dr. Behroozmand has background in Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience and his research is focused on investigating the neural bases of speech production and motor control in the human brain. His lab utilizes a wide range of techniques including electrophysiology (EEG, ERP, ECoG), functional neuroimaging (fMRI) and high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) to study sensory-motor mechanisms of speech in healthy individuals and patients with neurological disorders. The ultimate goal of this research is to gain knowledge that can be translated into the development of novel diagnosis and clinical treatment methods to enhance speech communication and improve quality of life in patients with speech disorders.

   
Karim

Karim Johari

PhD Student

Karim Johari is a doctoral student in the Department of Communication Disorders at the University of South Carolina. He has received his Master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology from Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Karim’s primary line of research in the Speech Neuroscience Lab focuses on understanding the neural bases of speech and hand movement disorders in Parkinson’s disease. As a part of his doctoral dissertation project, Karim is investigating the behavioral and neurophysiological (EEG and ERP) correlates of reaction time and motor learning in speech and hand modalities in both healthy individuals and patients with Parkinson’s disease.

   
Lorelei Phillip

Lorelei Phillip

PhD Student

Lorelei Phillip, M.S., CF-SLP, is a doctoral student in the Aphasia Lab at the University of South Carolina in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her research interests include aphasia treatment and recovery, post-stroke quality of life, and neuroimaging methods. While collaborating with the members in the Speech Neuroscience Lab, her research has focused on the neural time course of activation associated with speech and language in individuals who have aphasia, an acquired language disorder frequently occurring after stroke. She is also interested in learning more about EEG methodology as well as general data analysis methods.

   
Janelle

Janelle Rocktashel

PhD Student

Janelle Rocktashel is a first year doctoral student in the Exercise Science department under the mentorship of Dr. Jill Stewart in the Motor Behavior and Neuroimaging Lab with a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology from The Pennsylvania State University. She is interested in understanding the neural correlates of motor control in neurologically impaired populations, particularly chronic stroke. As a scholar in the Biomedical-Behavioral Interface Program (BBIP), Janelle has had the opportunity to rotate through the Speech Neuroscience Lab where she is involved with electroencephalography (EEG) recording for the Aphasia study including pitch-shift, picture matching, and picture naming tasks. Throughout her doctoral studies, she hopes to collaborate further with Dr. Behroozmand in order to integrate EEG motor control studies with upper extremity reach tasks.

   
Stacey

Stacey Sangtian

MSc Student

Stacey Sangtian is currently a second-year Master’s student in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Carolina. She has been involved in a number of research projects in the Speech Neuroscience Lab to investigate the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of speech production and motor control mechanisms. For her studies, Stacey has used the electroencephalography (EEG) technique to measure human brain activity in a variety of speech production, motor control and adaptation tasks. She is also completing her Master's thesis under the supervision of Dr. Behroozmand investigating how motor planning and execution during the preparatory phase of a speech task can modulate the mechanisms of speech motor control. The goal of her Master’s thesis project is to better understand how neural deficiencies related to motor planning may negatively affect the motor control pf speech in neurological patients with speech disorders.

   
Chantel Juitt

Chantel Juitt

MSc Student

Chantel Juitt is a second-year Master’s student in the department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is currently working in the Speech Neuroscience Lab working on a research project to study the neural bases of speech motor adaptation in the human brain. Her study involves the recording of human brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG) combined with the auditory feedback pitch perturbation technique.

   
Victoria Rogers

Victoria Rogers

MSc Student

Victoria Rogers is a second-year Master’s student in Speech-Language Pathology with special interests in neurogenic disorders specialization track. She is currently completing her research in the Speech Neuroscience Lab to investigate the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of speech motor adaptation in response to pitch-shifted auditory feedback. Her project involves the use of electroencephalography (EEG) technology to measure human brain activity during speech production and motor control.

   
Erin Hurst

Erin Hurst

MSc Student

Erin Hurst is currently a Master’s student in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Carolina. She is currently working in the Speech Neuroscience Lab to study speech production and motor control in 60-80 year old participants. Her study involves the recording of human brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG) to study speech production and motor control.

   
Meg Johnson

Meg Johnson

MSc Student

Meg Johnson is a first year Master’s student in the Speech-Language Pathology program and is a part of the neurogenic disorders specialization track at the University of South Carolina. She is currently studying speech production and motor control in the Speech Neuroscience Lab. Her project involves the use of electroencephalography (EEG) to analyze speech production and motor control.

   
Sarah Neal

Sarah Neal

MSc Student

Sarah Neal is currently a first-year Master’s student in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Carolina. With a background in Exercise Science and Motor Development, Sarah is interested in studying speech motor control of healthy subjects over the age of 60 years old. The data that is collected in her project will be used to deepen the understanding of motor control in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

   
Caroline Hayden

Caroline Hayden

Undergraduate Student

Caroline Hayden is an undergraduate student at the University of South Carolina majoring in Exercise Science, with specific focus on a scientific foundations pathway. For her continued studies, she is interested to apply for the Medical school or Physician’s Assistant school following graduation. In join collaboration with the Neurolinguistics Lab (Dr. den Ouden) and the Speech Neuroscience Lab (Dr. Behroozmand), Caroline has received the Magellan Scholar Award on a project to investigate how non-invasive neurostimulation can affect speech motor control ability in the human brain. She is currently using the state-of-the-art HD-tDCS (High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation) technique and has combined it with electroencephalography (EEG) to measure changes in brain activity before and after neurostimulation during a speech motor control task. The goal of this research is to determine whether neurostimulation affects the ability to better control speech, and use the neurostimulation technology for the treatment of speech motor disorders in patients with neurological impairments such as Parkinson’s disease.

   
Ellie Thompson

Ellie Thompson

Undergraduate Student

Ellie Thompson is an undergraduate at the University of South Carolina majoring in Biological Sciences. She is currently working in the Speech Neuroscience Lab collaborating in a project to investigate the effect of high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) on improving speech and hand motor movement. The goal of this research is to determine if HD-tDCS speeds up movement response times in healthy individuals. The outcome of this research can be translated to treatment of movement disorders in patients with neurological impairment such as Parkinson’s disease.

   

 

USC Arnold School of Public Health